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US guided-missile submarine arrives in South Korea, a day after North Korea resumes missile tests

by Madison Thomas
4 comments
tensions

A day after North Korea resumed missile tests in response to U.S.-South Korean live-fire drills, a guided-missile submarine from the United States has arrived in South Korea. The USS Michigan, a nuclear-powered submarine capable of carrying approximately 150 Tomahawk missiles, reached the southeastern port city of Busan. This deployment, the first of its kind in six years, is part of bilateral agreements between the U.S. and South Korea to increase the visibility of U.S. strategic assets on the Korean Peninsula due to North Korea’s advancing nuclear program.

The South Korean Defense Ministry stated that the arrival of the USS Michigan would lead to joint drills between the U.S. and South Korean navies, focusing on strengthening special operation capabilities and their ability to counter the growing nuclear threats from North Korea. However, the duration of the submarine’s stay in South Korean waters was not disclosed.

The USS Michigan, an Ohio-class guided-missile submarine, is one of the largest submarines globally. It is armed with 150 Tomahawk missiles, which have a range of approximately 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles), and possesses the capability to carry out special forces missions.

In response to North Korea’s provocative missile tests, the South Korean and U.S. militaries have been expanding their joint exercises. While North Korea claims that it is responding to perceived invasion rehearsals by its rivals, experts suggest that the country’s underlying objective is to modernize its arsenal and enhance its negotiating power in future diplomacy.

During a meeting in Washington in April, President Joe Biden and South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol agreed to increase the regular visibility of strategic assets on the Korean Peninsula. Biden also warned that any nuclear attack by North Korea on the U.S. or its allies would result in the end of the attacking regime.

Kim Yo Jong, the influential sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, criticized the agreements reached at the Biden-Yoon summit, perceiving them as displaying hostile and aggressive intentions towards North Korea. She threatened to further strengthen her country’s nuclear forces.

On Thursday, North Korea launched two short-range ballistic missiles towards its eastern waters, following the conclusion of joint firing drills between South Korea and the U.S. near the heavily armed border of the two Koreas. These missile tests marked North Korea’s first weapons launches since its unsuccessful attempt to launch a spy satellite in late May.

South Korea’s Defense Ministry announced on Friday that search crews had recovered what they believed to be part of the crashed North Korean rocket. Photos of a white, metal cylinder, potentially the rocket’s fuel tank, were released by the ministry.

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about tensions

Q: Why did the United States deploy a guided-missile submarine to South Korea?

A: The United States deployed a guided-missile submarine to South Korea in response to North Korea’s resumption of missile tests and its advancing nuclear program. It is part of bilateral agreements aimed at enhancing the visibility of U.S. strategic assets on the Korean Peninsula and strengthening joint capabilities to address the growing North Korean nuclear threats.

Q: What is the significance of the USS Michigan’s arrival in South Korea?

A: The arrival of the USS Michigan is significant as it marks the first deployment of its kind in six years. It is one of the largest submarines globally and is capable of carrying about 150 Tomahawk missiles with a range of 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles). Its presence aims to bolster joint drills and enhance the special operation capabilities of the U.S. and South Korean navies to counter North Korea’s nuclear advancements.

Q: How are the U.S. and South Korean militaries responding to North Korea’s missile tests?

A: The U.S. and South Korean militaries have been expanding their exercises in response to North Korea’s provocative missile tests. These joint drills aim to deter North Korea’s aggression and enhance readiness in the face of potential threats. The U.S. and South Korea are also increasing the visibility of strategic assets, periodically docking a U.S. nuclear ballistic missile submarine in South Korea, and establishing a new nuclear consultative group.

Q: What is North Korea’s rationale for its missile tests?

A: North Korea claims that it is responding to what it perceives as invasion rehearsals by its rivals, the U.S. and South Korea. However, experts believe that North Korea’s ultimate goal is to modernize its arsenal and gain leverage in future diplomatic negotiations. The missile tests are seen as a means for North Korea to assert its military capabilities and strengthen its position in regional dynamics.

Q: How did North Korea respond to the agreements reached at the Biden-Yoon summit?

A: Kim Yo Jong, the powerful sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, criticized the agreements reached at the Biden-Yoon summit. She viewed them as displaying hostile and aggressive intentions towards North Korea and threatened to further strengthen the country’s nuclear forces. Her response underscores the ongoing tensions and challenges in the relationship between North Korea and the U.S.-South Korean alliance.

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4 comments

John123 June 16, 2023 - 7:52 am

wow, USS michigan arrives in south korea to deal with north korea missile tests. tension rising on korean peninsula!

Reply
LilyGrl June 16, 2023 - 8:56 pm

us deployed nuclear powerd submarine. big and powerful! can carry lot of missiles. hope it makes a difference.

Reply
TechGeek92 June 17, 2023 - 12:30 am

USS michigan, super cool submarine! can launch special ops missions. high-tech stuff, man!

Reply
KimchiLover June 17, 2023 - 3:30 am

north korea mad again, shooting missiles. us and south korea join forces. maybe they stop? fingers crossed!

Reply

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