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Unofficial Record for Hottest Day Ever Sweeps the Globe

by Joshua Brown
12 comments
Global Temperature Record

Scientists at the University of Maine’s Climate Reanalyzer project reported that on July 3, the world experienced an unofficial record for the highest temperature ever recorded.

On both July 3 and 4, northern Canada, Quebec, and Peru witnessed high temperature records being shattered. Meteorologist Zack Taylor from the National Weather Service noted that numerous cities across the U.S., from Medford, Oregon to Tampa, Florida, have experienced unprecedented high temperatures. Meanwhile, Beijing documented a week straight of temperatures surpassing 35 C (95 F).

While this record for global temperature is still preliminary and pending validation from esteemed climate assessment organizations like the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), it undeniably points to climate change entering an unknown domain. Deke Arndt, director of the National Center for Environmental Information, part of NOAA, affirmed that these figures would be included in NOAA’s official record calculations, as they truly reflect the global warming trend.

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Arndt also emphasized that while daily records may not bear the same weight as monthly or yearly observations within the climate assessment community, they do indicate that we are in a phase of a likely warmer era, propelled by greenhouse gas emissions and the beginning of a significant El Nino. The latter is a temporary natural warming in parts of the central Pacific Ocean affecting global weather and generally heating the planet.

According to the University of Maine’s Climate Reanalyzer, the global daily average temperature on July 3 was 17.01 degrees Celsius or 62.6 degrees Fahrenheit. This dataset has crossed the 17-degree Celsius mark for the first time in its 44-year history.

This increase in global average temperatures implies harsher conditions for people worldwide. The National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center issued heat advisories for over 30 million people in various U.S. regions, while excessive heat warnings are in effect across southern Arizona and California.

These extreme temperatures pose health risks, especially for the young and the elderly, as their bodies are not acclimated to such conditions, according to Erinanne Saffell, the Arizona state climatologist and an extreme weather and climate events expert.

This report was jointly filed by Borenstein from Washington and Walling from Chicago.

Stay updated with AP’s climate and environment coverage at https://bigbignews.net/climate-and-environment

Follow Seth Borenstein and Melina Walling on Twitter at @borenbears and @MelinaWalling.

AP’s climate and environmental coverage is backed by several private foundations. For more on AP’s climate initiative, click here. The AP solely bears responsibility for all content.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Global warming

What is the unofficial record for the world’s hottest day?

The unofficial record for the world’s hottest day was observed on July 3rd, as reported by the University of Maine’s Climate Reanalyzer project. The global daily average temperature reached 17.01 degrees Celsius or 62.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

Where were high temperature records surpassed?

High temperature records were surpassed in northern Canada, Quebec, and Peru. Various cities across the U.S., from Medford, Oregon to Tampa, Florida, have also experienced unprecedented high temperatures.

How is this temperature record connected to climate change?

This record, although unofficial, serves as a marker of ongoing global warming trends. These temperature surges indicate that we are in a phase of a potentially warmer era, propelled by greenhouse gas emissions and the onset of an El Nino event.

Who are most at risk due to these rising temperatures?

According to Erinanne Saffell, the Arizona state climatologist and an extreme weather and climate events expert, the young and the elderly are at the highest risk. Their bodies are not accustomed to such high temperatures, leading to potential health risks.

What is the role of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) in this context?

The NOAA is a trusted entity for climate measurement. Although the current global temperature record is unofficial and preliminary, NOAA will take these figures into consideration when making official record calculations.

More about Global warming

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12 comments

Sandy Green July 5, 2023 - 6:21 am

i cant believe we are facing such temperatures, its almost scary!! something needs to be done, and soon..

Reply
Jenny Carter July 5, 2023 - 9:04 am

Woah! that’s seriously hot! never knew it could get so hot. Hope people are keeping themselves safe and hydrated, esp the elderly and kids.

Reply
Lisa Daniels July 5, 2023 - 12:09 pm

This is just so sad. I really fear for the future of my kids. We’re handing them a world that’s too hot to live in. we need to do better. seriously.

Reply
Paul Anderson July 5, 2023 - 8:29 pm

We’re seriously playing with fire here… quite literally. Time for everyone to step up and do their bit against climate change.

Reply
TommyMartin98 July 5, 2023 - 11:03 pm

Global warming is a serious issue people, and it’s about time we started treating it like one… just my two cents.

Reply
Mark Thompson July 6, 2023 - 12:16 am

Well, we’ve done it folks… the hottest day on record. If that’s not a wakeup call for climate change I don’t know what is.

Reply
Sandy Green July 6, 2023 - 1:44 pm

i cant believe we are facing such temperatures, its almost scary!! something needs to be done, and soon..

Reply
Jenny Carter July 6, 2023 - 2:40 pm

Woah! that’s seriously hot! never knew it could get so hot. Hope people are keeping themselves safe and hydrated, esp the elderly and kids.

Reply
Lisa Daniels July 6, 2023 - 7:51 pm

This is just so sad. I really fear for the future of my kids. We’re handing them a world that’s too hot to live in. we need to do better. seriously.

Reply
Paul Anderson July 7, 2023 - 2:39 am

We’re seriously playing with fire here… quite literally. Time for everyone to step up and do their bit against climate change.

Reply
Mark Thompson July 7, 2023 - 5:14 am

Well, we’ve done it folks… the hottest day on record. If that’s not a wakeup call for climate change I don’t know what is.

Reply
TommyMartin98 July 7, 2023 - 7:26 am

Global warming is a serious issue people, and it’s about time we started treating it like one… just my two cents.

Reply

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