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The No Labels party asked its supporters if they would pay $100 to help choose its 2024 nominee

by Andrew Wright
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Nomination Process Contemplation

The No Labels party, a political organization that has garnered attention for the possibility of launching a third-party presidential candidate, has considered a novel approach in its nominating process. According to documents obtained by The Big Big News, there has been contemplation of requiring a minimum donation of $100 to cast a ballot at the group’s upcoming nominating convention, a departure from the traditional norms in American politics.

This idea, if implemented, would introduce a significant barrier to participating in the democratic process within No Labels, specifically in the selection of potential presidential and vice-presidential candidates. It is worth noting that neither the Democratic nor Republican parties impose charges for voting at their conventions, where delegates typically vote for candidates determined by voters through primaries or caucuses.

The notion of requiring a donation was brought forward as part of an internal survey conducted by No Labels in September. Screenshots of this survey were shared with the Associated Press by an individual who participated in it. The survey aimed to explore how No Labels should go about selecting candidates for a bipartisan “unity ticket” in the event of a 2024 election rematch between Donald Trump and President Joe Biden.

In response to the concerns raised, No Labels officials have clarified that delegates to their convention will not be required to make donations. Ryan Clancy, the Chief Strategist for No Labels, emphasized their focus on achieving ballot access and reiterated their commitment to ensuring that delegates do not have to contribute financially to participate.

While No Labels initially intended to unveil its candidate selection plans in October, it has yet to do so. The survey provides a unique glimpse into the inner workings of a group that could have a significant impact on the 2024 election. Notably, in Arizona, No Labels has registered nearly 19,000 voters, a number exceeding President Biden’s winning margin over Donald Trump in the 2020 election. Some Democrats are concerned that a No Labels candidate could divert enough votes from Biden, potentially affecting the election outcome.

One of the survey questions inquired about the fairest method for selecting delegates for the No Labels nominating convention. Options included “active participation” within No Labels over a defined period, a $100 donation to demonstrate commitment, a signed commitment to support the group’s policy priorities and principles, and the selection of delegates by local No Labels chapters. It is noteworthy that neither the Democratic nor Republican parties require delegate donations, as affirmed by Elaine Kamarck, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

No Labels, which has secured ballot access in 13 states and is actively pursuing access in all 50 states, maintains that it will only proceed with a third-party bid if their candidate has a viable path to victory. They have emphasized their intention not to act as a spoiler in the election.

Despite this, they have not disclosed the criteria for moving forward or the specifics of how they will nominate a candidate at their April convention in Dallas. In the meantime, supporters of Senators Mitt Romney and Joe Manchin have initiated efforts to encourage them to seek the No Labels nomination.

The comprehensive survey, featuring over 70 questions, provides insights into how No Labels is shaping its plans and messaging. It explores various options for nominating presidential candidates, ranging from a convention with participants from all 50 states to a national primary involving millions of people interested in the No Labels effort. The survey also seeks input on the most persuasive message for the No Labels ticket to avoid being perceived as a spoiler.

Furthermore, it gauges preferences for terms that could describe the No Labels ticket, such as “independent,” “third-party,” “unity,” “No Labels,” or “common sense” candidate. It also solicits feedback on the aspects of the two-party system that respondents find most objectionable, without providing an option for those satisfied with the current system.

Towards the end of the survey, after exploring issues with the two-party system and the promotion of a third-party candidacy, it inquires about the likelihood of respondents voting for a third party. It is important to note that the sequencing of these questions could influence the survey results, potentially leading to artificially positive outcomes, as noted by pollster Paul Bentz, based in Phoenix.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Nomination Process Contemplation

What is No Labels, and why is it considering a $100 donation requirement for its nominating process?

No Labels is a political organization that has discussed the possibility of implementing a $100 donation requirement for its nominating convention. This move has raised questions due to its departure from the traditional norms in American politics.

How would a $100 donation requirement impact the democratic process within No Labels?

Requiring a $100 donation to cast a ballot at the nominating convention could create a significant barrier to participation in No Labels’ candidate selection process, potentially limiting the pool of eligible delegates.

How do the Democratic and Republican parties handle delegate voting at their conventions?

Unlike No Labels, both the Democratic and Republican parties do not charge delegates for voting at their conventions. Delegates typically vote for candidates chosen by voters through primaries or caucuses.

What was the purpose of the internal survey conducted by No Labels in September?

The internal survey aimed to explore how No Labels should select candidates for a potential bipartisan “unity ticket” in the event of a 2024 election rematch between Donald Trump and President Joe Biden.

How does No Labels plan to proceed with its candidate selection, and what impact could it have on the 2024 election?

No Labels has not yet disclosed its candidate selection plans but has indicated that it will only pursue a third-party bid if their candidate has a viable path to victory. Some Democrats are concerned that a No Labels candidate could affect the election outcome by diverting votes from their party’s nominee.

What were the options presented in the survey regarding the selection of delegates for the No Labels nominating convention?

The survey included options such as “active participation” within No Labels over a defined period, a $100 donation to demonstrate commitment, a signed commitment to support the group’s policy priorities and principles, and the selection of delegates by local No Labels chapters.

How has No Labels’s voter registration efforts in Arizona been significant in the context of the 2020 election?

No Labels registered nearly 19,000 voters in Arizona, a number larger than President Biden’s winning margin over Donald Trump in the 2020 election, potentially making them a significant factor in future elections.

What criteria will No Labels use to determine whether to move forward with a third-party bid?

No Labels has not disclosed specific criteria but has emphasized that they will only proceed if their candidate has a viable path to victory and that they do not intend to act as a spoiler in the election.

How did the sequencing of questions in the survey potentially influence its results?

The survey’s order of questions could lead to artificially positive results, as noted by pollster Paul Bentz, by shaping respondents’ perspectives based on the sequence of inquiries.

What were the key messages and terms explored in the survey to promote the No Labels cause?

The survey sought input on persuasive messages for the No Labels ticket to avoid being perceived as a spoiler. It also examined preferences for terms like “independent,” “third-party,” “unity,” “No Labels,” or “common sense” candidate.

What was the purpose of soliciting feedback on the two-party system and third-party voting likelihood?

The survey aimed to gauge respondents’ dissatisfaction with the two-party system and their likelihood of voting for a third party, potentially informing No Labels’ strategy and messaging.

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