LOGIN

The flu is soaring in seven US states and rising in others, health officials say

by Lucas Garcia
3 comments
Flu season in the US

The flu season has commenced in the United States, and health officials are noting significant flu activity in multiple states, while cases are on the rise in other regions of the country. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released updated flu data, revealing that Louisiana experienced very high flu activity last week. Additionally, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, New Mexico, and South Carolina reported high flu activity. The District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, also witnessed high levels of flu activity, with health officials in Puerto Rico even declaring an influenza epidemic earlier this month.

Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious diseases expert at Vanderbilt University, remarked, “We’re off to the races,” signaling the onset of the flu season. Traditionally, the winter flu season typically gains momentum in December or January. However, last year, it began in October, and this year, it is making an entrance in November.

Flu activity is described as moderate but increasing in New York City, Arkansas, California, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. In Alaska, flu activity has been high for several weeks, although the state did not provide data for the latest count.

Monitoring flu activity during the season relies partly on reports from individuals exhibiting flu-like symptoms who seek medical attention at doctor’s offices or hospitals. It’s worth noting that not everyone with the flu undergoes testing, leading to unconfirmed infections. Additionally, the presence of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses can complicate the overall picture.

Alicia Budd, who heads the CDC’s flu surveillance team, has indicated that multiple indicators are pointing towards “continued increases” in flu cases.

There are various strains of flu viruses, and the one predominant this year tends to result in fewer hospitalizations and deaths among the elderly, the group most vulnerable to flu-related complications. Thus far this autumn, the CDC estimates that there have been at least 780,000 flu illnesses, over 8,000 hospitalizations, and at least 490 flu-related deaths, including one child.

Regarding the effectiveness of current flu vaccines, it remains uncertain, but they are well-matched to the circulating flu strains. In the U.S., approximately 35% of adults and 33% of children have received flu vaccinations, according to current CDC data. These rates represent a decline compared to the previous year in both age groups.

It’s noteworthy that flu vaccination rates are relatively higher compared to the recommended vaccinations for other primary respiratory viruses, such as COVID-19 and RSV. Only around 14% of adults and 5% of children have received the currently recommended COVID-19 vaccine, while roughly 13.5% of adults aged 60 and older have received one of the RSV shots introduced earlier this year.

[Note: The provided text contains news content from an external source, and the information is accurate as of the date mentioned in the text.]

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Flu season in the US

When does the flu season typically start in the United States?

The flu season traditionally begins in December or January.

What is the current status of flu activity in the US?

Health officials report high flu activity in at least seven states, with rising cases in other parts of the country.

Which states are currently experiencing high flu activity?

The states with high flu activity include Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, New Mexico, and South Carolina.

Has the flu season started earlier than usual this year?

Yes, the flu season began in November this year, which is earlier than the typical December or January start.

Are there any regions outside the states mentioned experiencing elevated flu activity?

The District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have also reported high levels of flu activity, with an influenza epidemic declared in Puerto Rico.

What indicators suggest continued increases in flu cases?

According to the CDC’s flu surveillance team, several indicators point to “continued increases” in flu activity.

What are the estimated flu-related statistics for this fall?

So far this fall, there have been at least 780,000 flu illnesses, over 8,000 hospitalizations, and at least 490 flu-related deaths, including one child.

How effective are the current flu vaccines?

The effectiveness of current flu vaccines is not yet clear, but they are well-matched to the flu strains that are circulating.

What are the vaccination rates for flu in the US?

Approximately 35% of US adults and 33% of children have been vaccinated against the flu, representing a decline compared to the previous year in both age groups.

How do flu vaccination rates compare to other respiratory viruses like COVID-19 and RSV?

Flu vaccination rates are relatively higher, with around 14% of adults and 5% of children receiving the recommended COVID-19 vaccine, and approximately 13.5% of adults aged 60 and older receiving one of the RSV shots introduced earlier this year.

More about Flu season in the US

You may also like

3 comments

Reader247 November 18, 2023 - 9:22 am

flu season start early! Crazzy. high flu in some states! CDC says so.

Reply
InfoHound2023 November 18, 2023 - 9:55 pm

Puerto Rico in flu epidemic? Serious stuff! CDC tracking.

Reply
HealthNut55 November 19, 2023 - 2:15 am

Vax rates down! Not good. Get ur flu shot, folks!

Reply

Leave a Comment

logo-site-white

BNB – Big Big News is a news portal that offers the latest news from around the world. BNB – Big Big News focuses on providing readers with the most up-to-date information from the U.S. and abroad, covering a wide range of topics, including politics, sports, entertainment, business, health, and more.

Editors' Picks

Latest News

© 2023 BBN – Big Big News

en_USEnglish