LOGIN

Sweltering temperatures bring misery to large portion of central US, setting heat records

by Ryan Lee
5 comments
fokus keyword Sweltering temperatures

Sweltering heat continued its grip over a wide stretch of the central United States on Sunday, creating discomfort from the Gulf of Mexico all the way to the Great Lakes.

Record-breaking temperatures were noted in Texas and other states, with individuals advised to drink additional water during outdoor activities such as lawn mowing or exercising and to look out for neighbors to ensure they have access to air conditioning. In response to the heat wave, Texas’ electric power grid manager urged residents to voluntarily conserve electricity for a three-hour period on Sunday night.

Sarah Russell, the commissioner for the St. Louis Emergency Management Agency, emphasized the potential impact on those living alone and the importance of checking on loved ones’ well-being during the intense heat.

The Dallas-Fort Worth region was bracing for temperatures of up to 110 F (43.3 C) on Sunday, having already experienced 108 F (42.2 C) the previous day, according to Sarah Barnes, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. These temperatures surpassed the previous record of 107 F (41.7 C) from 2011.

The lack of nighttime cooling in the area was highlighted by Barnes as a significant concern, contributing to an increased risk of heat-related ailments.

On Sunday, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) requested that the state’s 30 million residents reduce power usage between 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. CDT due to extreme heat, high demand, and unexpected loss of thermal generation. This marked ERCOT’s second such request in three days, although it stated it was not in emergency operations.

Scientists have repeatedly warned that climate change, fueled by fossil fuel consumption, deforestation, and certain agricultural practices, will cause more frequent and extended episodes of extreme weather, such as hotter temperatures.

Heat advisories or warnings were issued for multiple states, including Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, and Nebraska.

In New Orleans, tourist activity often diminishes during the peak summer heat, and this trend is evident as temperatures near 100 F (37.8 C). Local businesses like NOLA Poboys have had to adjust, with one of its chefs expressing a longing for cooler weather.

Other areas, such as Jackson, Mississippi, and Houston, Texas, also recorded extreme temperatures, with Houston reaching a 22-day streak of at least 100 F (37.8 C).

The intense Texas heat led to 38 students being hospitalized for heat-related illnesses at Prairie View A&M University, prompting officials to review procedures.

Iowa’s high temperatures, expected to top 100 F (37.8 C), posed a particular concern for the Iowa State Fair’s final day, leading officials to urge fair-goers to seek out air-conditioned buildings, rest regularly, and keep hydrated.

Forecasts in St. Louis predicted temperatures ranging from 99 F (37.2 C) to 103 F (39.4 C) through the week, with high humidity, resulting in a heat index of up to 115 F (46.1 C) each day. Similar conditions were anticipated in Little Rock, Arkansas, leading to the opening of several cooling centers.

Last month, the Phoenix area endured an unprecedented 31 consecutive days of daily high temperatures of 110 F (43.4 C) or above, breaking the previous record of 18 straight days in 1974. July also saw the continental United States set a record for overnight warmth, providing minimal respite from the daytime heat.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention record between 600 to 700 annual heat deaths in the United States, though inconsistencies in data reporting across counties mean that the true number of fatalities remains unclear.

Report contributors include Jim Salter in St. Louis, Jackie Quinn in Washington, and Emily Wagster Pettus in Jackson, Mississippi. More on climate and environmental issues can be found at Big Big News’ climate and environment section.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about fokus keyword Sweltering temperatures

What areas of the U.S. were affected by the sweltering temperatures?

The sweltering temperatures affected a large portion of the central United States, ranging from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Lakes, including states such as Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and South Dakota.

Who was asked to conserve power and why?

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) asked the state’s 30 million residents to voluntarily reduce power usage from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. CDT on Sunday. The request was made due to “extreme temperatures, continued high demand, and unexpected loss of thermal generation.”

How have businesses and events been affected by the heat?

Businesses like NOLA Poboys in New Orleans have adjusted their operations, and the Iowa State Fair officials urged patrons to seek out air-conditioned buildings and stay hydrated. Tourism has also slowed in areas like New Orleans due to the extreme heat.

What warnings or advisories were issued due to the heat?

The National Weather Service issued an excessive heat warning for parts of Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, and Nebraska. Heat advisories or watches were also in place in other states, including Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and South Dakota.

Were there any heat-related illnesses or incidents reported?

Yes, 38 students were hospitalized for heat-related illnesses, including dehydration, at Prairie View A&M University in Texas. Additionally, the lack of nighttime cooling in some areas was noted as a significant concern, contributing to an increased risk of heat-related ailments.

What are some of the long-term concerns related to such heat waves?

Scientists have warned that climate change, driven by factors such as fossil fuel consumption, deforestation, and certain agricultural practices, will lead to more frequent and prolonged bouts of extreme weather, including hotter temperatures. The overall impact of heat-related deaths may also be underreported due to inconsistencies in data reporting across different counties.

More about fokus keyword Sweltering temperatures

You may also like

5 comments

Emily Q August 21, 2023 - 6:08 am

Wow, 38 students hospitalized, thats really concerning! We need to educate people more on how to deal with this kind of heat. Stay safe out there everyone.

Reply
John Smith August 21, 2023 - 7:38 am

i can’t believe the temperatures are getting this high, This is truly alarming what’s happening to the planet. Everyone needs to pay attention!!

Reply
Tom R August 21, 2023 - 9:46 am

Scientists have been warning us for years. Climate change isn’t a joke. It’s real and its effects are here. i hope more people start to understand and take action.

Reply
Sara Jenkins August 22, 2023 - 1:44 am

Its scorching out here in Texas, folks are really struggling, please check on your neighbors, especially if they live alone. #heatwave

Reply
Mike D August 22, 2023 - 3:38 am

Where’s the government in all this, why arent there more cooling centers or help for people without airconditioning?

Reply

Leave a Comment

logo-site-white

BNB – Big Big News is a news portal that offers the latest news from around the world. BNB – Big Big News focuses on providing readers with the most up-to-date information from the U.S. and abroad, covering a wide range of topics, including politics, sports, entertainment, business, health, and more.

Editors' Picks

Latest News

© 2023 BBN – Big Big News

en_USEnglish