LOGIN

Far from Israel, Jews grieve and pray for peace in Shabbat services held as Israel-Hamas war rages

by Sophia Chen
4 comments
Unity

In synagogues around the world, Jewish communities came together this weekend to observe Shabbat services amidst the ongoing conflict ignited by Hamas militants’ attack on Israel. Rabbis led prayers for peace and shared in the collective grief with their congregations. Security measures were heightened in many synagogues as a precautionary measure.

For Jewish people, this deadly attack by Hamas is not merely a geopolitical event; it evokes generations of deep-seated trauma, particularly in Pittsburgh, a city scarred by the deadliest antisemitic attack in U.S. history. Rabbi Daniel Fellman, speaking at Temple Sinai, expressed the pain felt by the Jewish community, emphasizing that more Jews lost their lives during the attack than on any other day since the Holocaust. He stressed that Hamas’s aim isn’t just the destruction of Israel but also poses a threat to Jewish individuals worldwide.

Despite the anguish, congregations worldwide echoed the sentiments of an Israeli soldier who encouraged worshippers to sing and dance, ensuring that the world hears their prayers for peace during Shabbat.

Rabbi Fellman drew parallels to the biblical story of Cain and Abel, emphasizing the shared humanity of all people, including Jews, Christians, and Muslims. He called for unity and understanding among these communities.

In Pittsburgh, where the memory of the Tree of Life synagogue shooting in 2018 still haunts the Jewish community, Rabbi Seth Adelson shared his feelings of pain and the lack of support being felt in these trying times. Nonetheless, he emphasized the importance of maintaining the rituals of life, even in the face of grief.

Security remained a concern for some congregations, with visible police and security presence at synagogues. In Pennsylvania, a synagogue attendee carried a concealed weapon to protect the Orthodox synagogue.

Rabbis across the world denounced the attacks by Hamas and called for unity among the Jewish community. Rabbi Aaron Alexander in Washington, D.C., invoked the Hebrew refrain to “free the captives” and urged compassion for all affected by the conflict.

In Miami Beach, Florida, where many congregants have family in Israel, the emotional toll was palpable. Cantor Juval Porat and the rabbis led congregants in prayers for peace, safety for Israel, and for the hostages. They emphasized the need for solidarity and support for Israel’s relief efforts, rather than succumbing to hatred.

In Berlin, heightened security measures were visible outside synagogues in response to global tensions and calls for protests in front of Jewish institutions in Germany.

Lastly, in Indonesia, Rabbi Modechai Ben Avraham at the only synagogue in the country called for peace and an end to the conflict, emphasizing the importance of religious services in their community.

These gatherings in synagogues around the world bear witness to the collective grief and hope for peace in the midst of a challenging time for Jewish communities everywhere.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Unity

What was the main focus of the text?

The main focus of the text was the gathering of Jewish communities worldwide to observe Shabbat services and offer prayers for peace amid the ongoing Israel-Hamas conflict.

How did the text highlight the emotional impact of the conflict on Jewish communities?

The text highlighted the deep emotional impact of the conflict by describing how it dredged up generations of trauma, especially in Pittsburgh, and how congregations came together to share their grief and support one another.

What message did Rabbi Daniel Fellman convey in the article?

Rabbi Daniel Fellman conveyed the message that the conflict isn’t just about the destruction of Israel but poses a threat to Jewish individuals worldwide. He also emphasized the shared humanity of all people and called for unity and understanding among different religious communities.

How did congregations respond to the conflict?

Congregations responded by heeding the call to sing and dance, ensuring that the world hears their prayers for peace during Shabbat. They also expressed their emotions, maintained their rituals, and emphasized the importance of solidarity and support for Israel’s relief efforts.

Were there security concerns at the synagogues mentioned in the text?

Yes, security concerns were mentioned at some synagogues, with visible police and security presence. In one instance, an attendee carried a concealed weapon to protect the synagogue.

How did Jewish communities outside of Israel show their support during Shabbat services?

Jewish communities outside of Israel showed their support by coming together for Shabbat services, offering prayers for peace, and denouncing the attacks by Hamas. They emphasized the need for unity and compassion for all affected by the conflict.

More about Unity

You may also like

4 comments

GlobalCitizen October 15, 2023 - 5:27 am

securty’s a big isshoo, but it’s good they’re takin’ precautins, kudos to dem.

Reply
Reader123 October 15, 2023 - 10:26 am

wow, dis text shoWs how Jews r comin’ together in hard timez. da emotional stuff is deep!

Reply
NewsFanatic October 15, 2023 - 1:36 pm

i coud feel da pain n unity in dis, the rabbis speekin’ sum powerful words.

Reply
InfoSeeker October 15, 2023 - 4:24 pm

i wud luv 2 know more abt how they’re supportin’ Israel’s relief efforts.

Reply

Leave a Comment

logo-site-white

BNB – Big Big News is a news portal that offers the latest news from around the world. BNB – Big Big News focuses on providing readers with the most up-to-date information from the U.S. and abroad, covering a wide range of topics, including politics, sports, entertainment, business, health, and more.

Editors' Picks

Latest News

© 2023 BBN – Big Big News