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F1 fans file class-action lawsuit against the Las Vegas Grand Prix

by Sophia Chen
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Class-action lawsuit

Formula One enthusiasts who were compelled to vacate the Las Vegas Grand Prix premises early on Friday morning, just before the commencement of the second practice session, have taken legal action. The Las Vegas-based Dimopoulos Law Firm, in collaboration with JK Legal & Consulting, has initiated a class-action lawsuit against the Las Vegas Grand Prix and its proprietor, Liberty Media, within the jurisdiction of Nevada state court, with a demand for no less than $30,000 in restitution.

The individuals who had purchased tickets for the opening night of the race witnessed a mere nine minutes of on-track action on Thursday evening before an unfortunate incident involving Carlos Sainz Jr., who inadvertently ran over a water valve cover, causing damage to his Ferrari. In response, race officials conducted a thorough inspection of the circuit, resulting in a 2 1/2-hour delay for the commencement of the second session, which ultimately started at 2:30 a.m. local time on Friday. Furthermore, the practice session duration was extended from one hour to 90 minutes.

Race organizers subsequently attempted to ameliorate the situation by offering a $200 discount at the official gift shop, but this concession was exclusively applicable to those in possession of single-night tickets for Thursday’s events. It’s worth noting that a substantial majority of attendees held three-day passes.

F1 President Stefano Domenicali and Renee Wilm, the CEO of the Las Vegas Grand Prix, released an official statement on Friday elucidating their decision to bar spectators from the track. They cited concerns related to safety and legal considerations as the primary rationale behind this course of action. Their statement also acknowledged that unforeseen circumstances, such as inclement weather or technical issues, have led to the cancellation of events in the past, emphasizing the need for understanding in such situations.

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Class-action lawsuit

What prompted the class-action lawsuit against the Las Vegas Grand Prix?

Formula One fans initiated a class-action lawsuit against the Las Vegas Grand Prix due to their premature evacuation from the venue before the start of the second practice session. This was caused by an incident involving Carlos Sainz Jr., who damaged his Ferrari by running over a water valve cover, resulting in an extended delay and dissatisfaction among ticket holders.

Who filed the lawsuit against the Las Vegas Grand Prix?

The class-action lawsuit was filed by the Dimopoulos Law Firm, based in Las Vegas, along with co-counsel JK Legal & Consulting. They are representing the interests of disgruntled Formula One enthusiasts seeking compensation for their disrupted experience.

What are the damages sought in the lawsuit?

The lawsuit seeks a minimum of $30,000 in damages from the Las Vegas Grand Prix and its owner, Liberty Media. This financial claim is a response to the inconvenience and disappointment experienced by attendees who had purchased tickets for the event.

How did race officials respond to the disruption?

Race officials conducted a comprehensive inspection of the track following the incident involving Carlos Sainz Jr. This led to a substantial delay in the schedule, with the second practice session beginning at 2:30 a.m. local time on Friday. The session duration was also extended from one hour to 90 minutes in an effort to compensate for the delay.

What compensation was offered to affected fans?

In an attempt to appease attendees, race organizers provided a $200 discount at the official gift shop. However, this discount was only applicable to those who held single-night tickets for Thursday’s events. Unfortunately, the majority of fans possessed three-day passes, rendering this concession inadequate for most.

Why did race officials close the track to spectators?

F1 President Stefano Domenicali and Renee Wilm, CEO of the Las Vegas Grand Prix, made the decision to close the track to spectators primarily for safety and legal reasons. They cited concerns related to ensuring the well-being of attendees and compliance with legal obligations. They also highlighted that events, including Formula One races, have been canceled in the past due to factors like adverse weather or technical issues, emphasizing the need for understanding in such situations.

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