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Earth Breaks Heat Records for the Third Time This Week

by Gabriel Martinez
4 comments
Climate Change Crisis

On Thursday, Earth experienced another alarming milestone as its average temperature reached a new unofficial record high. This marked the third occurrence in a single week, which had already been classified as the hottest on record.

According to data from the University of Maine’s Climate Reanalyzer, a tool that utilizes satellite data and computer simulations to assess global conditions, the planetary average soared to 63 degrees Fahrenheit (17.23 degrees Celsius). This surpassed the previous marks of 62.9 degrees Fahrenheit and 17.18 degrees Celsius recorded on Tuesday and equaled on Wednesday.

These scorching temperatures were observed in various locations worldwide, ranging from Jingxing, China, where the mercury climbed to nearly 110 degrees Fahrenheit (43.3 degrees Celsius), to the unexpectedly warm Antarctic region. In Antarctica, temperatures throughout much of the continent exceeded normal levels by as much as 8 degrees Fahrenheit (4.5 degrees Celsius) this week.

In response to the findings from the University of Maine, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued a cautionary statement, highlighting their inability to verify the data due to its reliance on computer modeling. However, NOAA acknowledged that the current warm period aligns with the broader trend of climate change.

Despite the skepticism surrounding the analysis, the University of Maine’s data has been widely regarded as another distressing indication of the ongoing climate crisis. Several climate scientists expressed little surprise at the unofficial temperature records witnessed this week.

Robert Watson, a scientist and former chairman of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, pointed out the lack of genuine commitment from governments, the private sector, and citizens in addressing climate change. He noted that the desire for cheap energy and food without accounting for their true costs hinder progress.

This report was filed by Borenstein from Washington and O’Malley from Philadelphia.

AP’s climate and environmental coverage is made possible with support from various private foundations. To learn more about AP’s climate initiative, click here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about climate change

Q: How many times did Earth break heat records in a week?

A: Earth broke heat records three times in a single week, marking it as the hottest week on record.

Q: What was the average temperature during the record-breaking period?

A: The average temperature during the record-breaking period reached 63 degrees Fahrenheit (17.23 degrees Celsius).

Q: Where was the highest temperature recorded?

A: The highest temperature was recorded in Jingxing, China, where it reached nearly 110 degrees Fahrenheit (43.3 degrees Celsius).

Q: How much above normal were the temperatures in Antarctica?

A: Temperatures in Antarctica were observed to be as much as 8 degrees Fahrenheit (4.5 degrees Celsius) above normal.

Q: What is the source of the temperature data?

A: The temperature data comes from the University of Maine’s Climate Reanalyzer, which uses satellite data and computer simulations to measure global conditions.

Q: How reliable is the data from the University of Maine?

A: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) cautions that they cannot independently verify the methodology or conclusions of the University of Maine’s analysis. However, NOAA acknowledges that the overall warm period aligns with climate change trends.

Q: Why are these temperature records concerning?

A: These temperature records are concerning because they are consistent with the ongoing climate change crisis, indicating the need for urgent action to mitigate its impacts.

Q: What are some views from climate scientists regarding the temperature records?

A: Some climate scientists express little surprise at the unofficial temperature records and highlight the lack of commitment from governments, the private sector, and citizens in addressing climate change.

Q: How does the AP contribute to climate and environmental coverage?

A: The AP’s climate and environmental coverage receives support from various private foundations, enabling them to provide comprehensive reporting on these issues.

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4 comments

EnviroWarrior77 July 7, 2023 - 6:10 pm

omg, Jingxing, China was almost burnin’ at 110°F! 🔥🔥 meanwhile, Antarctica is like, “I ain’t cold anymore, peeps!” 😂🐧 climate change is real, and it’s impactin’ our world big time. we gotta act fast and stop bein’ in denial. let’s save our planet, folks! 🌍💚

Reply
WeatherNerd42 July 7, 2023 - 8:17 pm

earth’s avg temp settin’ new records… 3 times in a week? that’s cray! 😲🌡️ these unofficial numbers, tho, can’t be 100% trusted. gotta rely on solid data, not just computer models. but hey, it’s still a warnin’ sign of climate change. we better pay attention! 🌎🌡️

Reply
ClimateWatcher21 July 8, 2023 - 2:38 am

wow, earth breakin’ heat records again?! like, seriously?? 🌍🔥 it’s gettin’ hotter every day, and it ain’t lookin’ good for our planet. gotta take this climate change thing seriously, folks! 😓

Reply
ScienceGeek88 July 8, 2023 - 6:35 am

NOAA says they can’t confirm the Uni of Maine’s analysis… but come on, we know we’re in a warm period thanks to climate change! 🌡️📊 the data might not be perfect, but it’s another warnin’ sign we can’t ignore. time to wake up and take action, people! 🌎💪

Reply

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