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Controversy Surrounds Demolition Proposal for House Where 4 University of Idaho Students Were Murdered

by Joshua Brown
10 comments
Demolition controversy

A proposal to demolish the house where four University of Idaho students were tragically killed last year has sparked objections. The families of three of the victims have expressed their desire to preserve the house until after the trial of the suspect charged in the deaths.

According to the Idaho Statesman, Shanon Gray, an attorney representing Kaylee Goncalves’ family, stated that the university is disregarding the families’ requests to keep the house intact until the trial of Bryan Kohberger, scheduled to commence in October.

The bodies of Kaylee Goncalves, Madison Mogen, Xana Kernodle, and Ethan Chapin were discovered on November 13 of last year in the rental home located near the University of Idaho campus. Bryan Kohberger faces four counts of murder in connection with their deaths.

The property’s owner donated it to the university after the tragic incident, and earlier this year, the university announced its plans to demolish the house. Although no specific date has been set for the demolition, Jodi Walker, a spokesperson for the university, mentioned that they aim to remove the house before the fall semester begins.

Gray expressed her disappointment in an email to the newspaper, stating that the university sought the families’ opinions but proceeded to ignore them and pursue their own interests. Gray highlighted the significant evidentiary value of the home, considering it the largest and one of the most crucial pieces of evidence in the case.

The attorney added that the Mogen and Kernodle families also oppose the demolition until after the trial. It remains uncertain what position the Chapin family holds, as they did not respond to the newspaper’s request for comment.

Furthermore, Gray represents the Goncalves and Mogen families in tort claims filed against the university, the city of Moscow, and Idaho State Police. This step safeguards the families’ rights to sue the government entities if they choose to pursue legal action in connection with the deaths of their children.

The university claims to have maintained regular communication with the victims’ families since acquiring ownership of the house. In correspondence with Gray, university attorney Kent Nelson mentioned that neither the prosecution nor the defense objected to the demolition of the property. Nelson requested a compelling argument supported by relevant case law or rules that would justify deviating from the demolition plans. He set a deadline of June 23 for a response.

As of now, it is unclear whether Gray met the deadline for a response or what course of action will be taken regarding the demolition proposal.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Demolition controversy

What is the controversy surrounding the demolition plans for the house where the University of Idaho students were killed?

Objections have been raised to the demolition plans for the house where four University of Idaho students were slain. Families of the victims are requesting that the house be preserved until after the trial of Bryan Kohberger, who is charged in connection with the deaths. They believe the house has significant evidentiary value and should be retained as crucial evidence in the case.

Who are the victims involved in this case?

The victims in this tragic incident are Kaylee Goncalves, Madison Mogen, Xana Kernodle, and Ethan Chapin. Their bodies were found in the rental home located near the University of Idaho campus.

Why does the university want to demolish the house?

The owner of the property donated it to the University of Idaho after the killings. The university has announced plans to demolish the house, but the specific reason behind this decision has not been explicitly stated. It is mentioned that the university wants the house gone before the start of the fall semester.

Are the families of all the victims against the demolition plans?

The attorney representing the families of Kaylee Goncalves, Madison Mogen, and Xana Kernodle have expressed their opposition to the demolition plans until after the trial. However, the position of the Chapin family, whose child was also a victim, is unclear as they have not commented on the matter.

Is the university considering the families’ objections?

The university claims to have maintained regular communication with the victims’ families since acquiring ownership of the house. However, the attorney representing the families stated that the university asked for their opinions but proceeded to ignore them and pursue their own interests.

What legal actions have been taken by the families?

The families of Kaylee Goncalves and Madison Mogen have filed tort claims against the university, the city of Moscow, and Idaho State Police. This step preserves their rights to sue the government entities if they choose to do so in connection with the deaths of their children.

More about Demolition controversy

  • Idaho Statesman – Source of the original article providing details on the controversy surrounding the demolition plans for the house.
  • University of Idaho – Official website of the University of Idaho, where the tragic incident occurred.
  • Idaho State Police – Official website of the Idaho State Police, one of the government entities involved in the tort claims filed by the families.
  • City of Moscow – Official website of the City of Moscow, another government entity mentioned in the tort claims filed by the families.

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10 comments

JaneDoe55 July 4, 2023 - 11:29 pm

i cant beleve the uni want to demolish the house! its has evidence! its importent! famlies rite!

Reply
GrammarNinja July 5, 2023 - 3:00 am

There are so many spelling and punctuation errors in these comments! Let’s take a moment to proofread and make our thoughts clearer.

Reply
SunshineDreamer July 5, 2023 - 11:27 am

It’s understandable that the families want to hold onto the house as evidence until the trial. Let’s hope they find some resolution that respects everyone involved.

Reply
L337H4x0r July 5, 2023 - 12:09 pm

D3m0l1t10n?! Wh@t 4 h0rr1bl3 1d34!! Pr3s3rv3 th3 h0us3 4s 3v1d3nc3! Jus7ic3 f0r th3 v1ct1ms!

Reply
Bookworm101 July 5, 2023 - 7:52 pm

I hope the university listens to the families and preserves the house. It’s heartbreaking to think about the loss they’ve suffered.

Reply
Bookworm101 July 6, 2023 - 5:26 pm

I hope the university listens to the families and preserves the house. It’s heartbreaking to think about the loss they’ve suffered.

Reply
JaneDoe55 July 6, 2023 - 10:03 pm

i cant beleve the uni want to demolish the house! its has evidence! its importent! famlies rite!

Reply
SunshineDreamer July 6, 2023 - 11:52 pm

It’s understandable that the families want to hold onto the house as evidence until the trial. Let’s hope they find some resolution that respects everyone involved.

Reply
L337H4x0r July 7, 2023 - 7:14 am

D3m0l1t10n?! Wh@t 4 h0rr1bl3 1d34!! Pr3s3rv3 th3 h0us3 4s 3v1d3nc3! Jus7ic3 f0r th3 v1ct1ms!

Reply
GrammarNinja July 7, 2023 - 7:44 am

There are so many spelling and punctuation errors in these comments! Let’s take a moment to proofread and make our thoughts clearer.

Reply

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