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Biden signs temporary spending bill averting government shutdown, pushing budget fight into new year

by Michael Nguyen
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Government Shutdown

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President Joe Biden signed a temporary spending bill on Thursday, just one day before a potential government shutdown. This move has shifted the budget dispute with congressional Republicans into the new year. At the same time, essential wartime aid for Ukraine and Israel remains on hold.

This temporary spending bill gained strong bipartisan support in both the House and Senate this week, ensuring that the government will remain operational throughout the holiday season. This extension may also provide lawmakers with additional time to address their significant differences regarding government spending for the current fiscal year. President Biden signed the bill in San Francisco, where he is hosting the summit of Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation economies.

The news of the signing was announced late at night, and the president signed the bill at the Legion of Honor Museum, where he hosted a dinner for APEC members.

This spending package maintains government funding at its current levels for approximately two more months, allowing for the negotiation of a long-term funding package. It establishes two separate deadlines for passing full-year appropriations bills: January 19 for some federal agencies and February 2 for others. This creates two potential dates when a partial government shutdown could occur.

It’s worth noting that this two-step approach was championed by the new House Speaker, Mike Johnson, a Republican, and although it wasn’t favored by many in the Senate, it received support from all but one Democrat and 10 Republicans. Their consensus ensured that the government would not shut down at this time. Johnson has expressed his commitment not to support any further stopgap funding measures, known as continuing resolutions, and he views the temporary funding bill as a precursor to a spending “fight” with the Senate in the coming year.

Notably, the spending bill does not include the White House’s nearly $106 billion request for wartime aid for Israel and Ukraine. It also does not allocate funds for humanitarian assistance for Palestinians or other supplemental requests, such as funding for border security. Lawmakers are likely to focus more intensively on these requests after the Thanksgiving holiday, with the hope of negotiating a deal.

AP writers Stephen Groves and Zeke Miller contributed to this report from Washington.

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Government Shutdown

What is the significance of President Biden signing the temporary spending bill?

President Biden signing the temporary spending bill is crucial because it averts a potential government shutdown and ensures that the government remains operational during the holiday season.

What does the temporary spending bill entail?

The temporary spending bill maintains government funding at current levels for approximately two more months, giving lawmakers extra time to negotiate a long-term funding package. It sets two separate deadlines for passing full-year appropriations bills for different federal agencies.

Why was this two-step approach to funding favored?

The two-step approach, championed by House Speaker Mike Johnson, received bipartisan support as it prevented an immediate government shutdown. However, it also signifies a forthcoming budget battle between the House and Senate.

What important funding requests are not included in this bill?

The temporary spending bill does not include the White House’s $106 billion request for wartime aid for Israel and Ukraine. Additionally, it lacks humanitarian funding for Palestinians and other supplemental requests, including border security funding.

When can we expect further discussions on the omitted funding requests?

Lawmakers are likely to focus on these omitted funding requests, including wartime aid and humanitarian assistance, after the Thanksgiving holiday, with hopes of negotiating a deal.

Who contributed to this report?

This report was contributed to by AP writers Stephen Groves and Zeke Miller from Washington.

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5 comments

AP_Fan November 17, 2023 - 12:13 pm

groves & miller report from dc, keepin us informed.

Reply
EconGuru November 18, 2023 - 5:04 am

no money for israel, ukraine, or borders, discuss afta turkey day.

Reply
PoliticObsvr November 18, 2023 - 6:56 am

two-step plan, bipartisan support, mike johnson leads, no shutdown now!

Reply
NewsGeek November 18, 2023 - 8:52 am

prez signs bill, avoids shutdown, funding fights await in new yr.

Reply
Reader123 November 18, 2023 - 9:26 am

biden signing temp spendin bill is a big deal, no shutdwn, gud for holidays.

Reply

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